Cycling day 31 – Eureka to Weott

Slightly inebriated at the Lost Coast brewery

Slightly inebriated at the Lost Coast brewery

After our last ride we decided to quickly check in and then check out Eureka’s Lost Coast Brewery. We bumped into fellow cyclists Josh & Johnnie and heavily sampled the local brews – we were the last to leave so we were glad we’d already decided to have a rest/hangover day. We’d planned to get some shopping in on this rest day but there was still a bit to do before we headed off for Burlington State Park near Weott.

Loaded up with new rain-jackets and sunglasses we made our way along the Highway 101 towards Loleta and Fernbridge. As we’d left late we decided to cut out Ferndale by riding along Waddington Drive. This shortcut rewarded us with some pretty pungent smells as we cycled past hundreds of cows. Yet again the moo game was unsuccessful but we did discover that cows like Metallica – they all seemed to turn their heads in unison as it pumped out of Sam’s bike stereo system.

P1010218We climbed a few short but steep hills on our way up to Rio Dell. There wasn’t a lot of options for lunch so we ended up with another burger at DJs Diner. Shortly after we popped into Scotia to pick up some supplies for dinner as the Weott campsite is pretty remote. There were no real shops closer to our destination as it was situated in the middle of ‘Avenue of the Giants’ Redwood forest.

The Avenue of the Giants was something we were both looking forward to seeing. We’d been told by several different sources it was the highlight of their trip. It’s essentially a 35 mile stretch of road that winds its way through the Redwood forest. The trees are up to 2000 years old and some of the trunks we saw were 6-8 metres wide. We took some GoPro footage which we’ll share once we’ve edited it down.

Camping amongst the redwoods

Camping amongst the redwoods

Due to our late start we decided to skip the turnoff to go see the ‘Big trees’ area but we did stop to check out the Immortal Tree. This trees claim to fame is that it has survived floods, logging and lightning strikes to be still going at the grand age of nearly 1000 years.

At around 7pm we arrived at the Burlington Park State Park and quickly put up our tents before sunset. It was pretty cool to cook our dinner surrounded by trees hundreds of years old – some of them probably in the thousands.

 

 

 

 

 

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